Tag Archives: schizophrenia

What causes psychosis?

There has been a lot in the news lately about people suffering from psychotic episodes. Recently, a man, whom many thought was under the influence of bath salts, took off his clothes and chewed off the face of a homeless man. Toxicology reports denied him being under the influence of bath salts but confirmed marijuana being in his system. Another news event broadcasted the sad episode of a Jet Blue pilot who started behaving in an erratic way,  talking in religion themes and Iraq and the end of the world. He had to be restrained by flight attendants and passengers on the airplane before the plane making an emergency landing.
What causes psychosis? Is this a biochemical or genetic condition? Are there environmental factors or health habits that contribute to it? What can be done to treat or prevent the condition from happening?

The definition of psychosis found in Wikepedia is: refers to an abnormal condition of the mind, and is a generic psychiatric term for a mental state often described as involving a “loss of contact with reality”. People suffering from psychosis are described as psychotic. Psychosis is given to the more severe forms of psychiatric disorder, during which hallucinations and delusions and impaired insight may occur.
The two major categories of mental illnesses we often associate with psychosis are the mood disorders such as Depression and Bipolar Disorder as its substypes as well as Schizophrenia. In Bipolar Disorder these psychotic episodes occur during the manic phases of the illness. There are other condtions that can cause psychosis. People under the influence of psychostimulants such as Ritalin or Cocaine or Methamphetamine may become psychotic, particularly if predisposed genetically to psychosis. Lately, in the news we have heard about people acting strangely under the influence of Bath Salts. And very recently, marijuana may have been a factor in the face eating incident.
In later years there is another cause that is being more and more recognized. Children who experience trauma may exhibit psychotic symptoms, particularly hearing voices. These children often don’t meet criteria for drug usage, mood disorders like Bipolar illness or Schizophrenia.
I personally have concerns about Marijuana. Many people would like to think that Marijuana is harmless. It is used for some chronic health issues like pain control and lack of appetite. Unfortunately, it is also being used inappropriately. I have had patients who come see me for an Anxiety problem who have complained to me that pot makes them anxious or even “crazy”. Pot will do this in people that are genetically predisposed toward psychosis. I once saw a promising young 18 year old man deterioriate and contract Schizophrenia, and Marijuana was believed to be the major culprit.

What is the treatment? It depends on the cause. If it is Bipolar Disorder, mood stabilizers and psychotherapy are the treatment of choice. Schizophrenia will probably require antipsychotic medication. If psychostimulants brought it on, they probably will need to be discontinued. For children with the history of trauma, medications may not be as effective as psychotherapy. Although many may find some benefit from both. Finally, the cause of the psychosis of the Jet Blue pilot was found to be the lack of sleep. I can’t emphasize enough the role of sleep in good mental health. I teach all my patients sleep hygiene who come to see me. A brain cannot heal or function optimally without a good nights sleep. What is the optimal amount? About 7-8 hours for most people.

Stimulants not always the answer for Attentive Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

In my practice, I’m amazed about how many people come to me and have taken some test online and have self-diagnosed themselves with ADHD or ADD and want me to give them stimulants. It happens every week. I also don’t know how many times I’ve had to tell these same people that stimulants may not be the answer to their problems and can even make their mental health symptoms worse! Let me give you a case in point of when stimulants may have done more harm than good.

Larry, (not his real name) is a 53 year old male who reports that he has taken Adderall or the equivalent for 30 years. He reports it makes him organized. It makes him be able to focus and concentrate and complete tasks. I take careful note but also observe that this same guy is very rigid, angry and irritable during our visit. He has a history of attempted suicide and has been hospitalized several times. He also tries to hide the fact that he lived in a reclusive situation away from civilization for years and has been unable to work for authority figures. He also reports he is estranged from friends and family.

Yes, it is true that stimulants help many people with focus and concentration. It is also the fact that ADHD is not the only condition that makes a person disorganized, unfocused and unable to complete tasks. For instance the guy above ended up being diagnosed with Schizophrenia. Other conditions like Bipolar Disorder, Depression, anxiety disorders and Thyroid Disorders can look like ADHD. Giving the above patient stimulants can bring out his rigidness, his anger and irritability and even psychotic symptoms. If one has tendencies toward obsessive compulsive disorder it would be especially important to avoid taking stimulants. Stimulants can make the OCD worse. A better way to go might be to effectively treat the OCD symptoms and the patient may find that their ADHD like symptoms greatly improve.

Sadly, years of stimulant misuse for the above patient made him so rigid in his expectations that he was psychologically unable to consider other possibilities for his problems. This is why it is so important that when suffering from ADHD like symptoms that a specialist who works regularly with the various mental illnesses be called upon to do the initial evaluation. It can potentially prevent years of problems and help a person become quickly more functional to reach his goals. I wish this guy could have been spared all the pain he went through! Can you imagine the implications for posterity and other family members?

An aspirin a day keeps Schizophrenia away?

According to a recent article in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, aspirin therapy reduces symptoms of psychosis in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders. It is speculated that inflammation is causing havoc in the brain as well as the body now. This reminds me of a study published I believe in the early 2000’s that suggested Ibuprofen may prevent Alzheimer’s Disease, another prevalent brain disease. 

Does that mean that we should all start taking aspirin daily? I wouldn’t do this without consulting with your psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner or psychiatrist. For some people aspirin and other anti-inflammatories can actually irritate the digestive tract and may even cause inflammation, so if you are in the category you may not be a good candidate for aspirin. Like anything, it is important to weigh the benefits with possible consequences. No two people are alike… However, it is the middle of the day and I am feeling a little cognitively fuzzy (and I have Schizophrenia and Alzheimers in the family)…not much of a caffeine drinker—just an occasional diet coke—perhaps I should try an aspirin? Hmm….