Tag Archives: attetion deficit-hyperactivity disorder

Family stressors tied to ADHD

A link I’ve long suspected has now been confirmed by scientists: Children who come from homes with troubling conditions are more likely to have ADHD than their peers from non-troubled homes.

The parent survey analysis showed ADHD has the strongest connection with economic hardship, divorce, familial mental illness, neighborhood violence, and familial incarceration. More severe cases of ADHD were tied most strongly with economic hardship and familial mental illness.

Children who deal with situations like these can develop toxic levels of stress, which can impair their brain development, behavior, and overall physical and mental health.

This is another reason it’s so important to look at a complete picture when it comes to mental health. For someone dealing with stressors at home as well as ADHD, it would be easy to confuse responses to stress with ADHD symptoms. We need to be sure we’re treating the symptoms from the most informed perspective about where they’re coming from.

Your child’s general practitioner may not know to ask these questions when a child shows signs of ADHD. Make sure you’re involving a specialist when it comes to helping your child with his or her mental health.

Satu Woodland is owner and clinician of Mental Health Solutions, an integrative mental health practice located at Bown Crossing in Boise, Idaho. She sees children, adolescents, and adults.

 

Critical parenting tied to persistent ADHD

I read an interesting study this week that showed a link between parental criticism and persistent ADHD.

It’s common for ADHD symptoms to decrease as children get older. That’s not true for all cases, though, and an important question for those developing treatment strategies and medications for ADHD is: What’s the difference?

This study identifies one difference. The researchers examined over 500 children–some with the attention disorder and some without–and their families for three years. They asked parents on two occasions to talk about their relationship with their child uninterrupted for five minutes.

In those families where parents used harsh, negative language when talking about the child, the child failed to show the usual improvement in ADHD symptoms over the three year period.

As with all studies, saying the connection shows a cause would be inaccurate. All they know right now is that there’s a link between parental criticism and persistent ADHD.

Here’s what one of the researchers says:

“We cannot say, from our data, that criticism is the cause of the sustained symptoms. Interventions to reduce parental criticism could lead to a reduction in ADHD symptoms, but other efforts to improve the severe symptoms of children with ADHD could also lead to a reduction in parental criticism, creating greater well-being in the family over time.”

ADHD is hard on families.  That’s one reason I recommend involving the whole family in therapy for this and many other disorders.

Go here to read more about the study and here to read more about ADHD.

Satu Woodland is owner and clinician of Mental Health Solutions, an integrative mental health practice located at Bown Crossing in Boise, Idaho. She sees children, adolescents, and adults.

Basic things to know about ADHD

What is ADHD?

ADHD is a term that’s thrown around so frequently these days, we all assume we know what it means. Used to apply to everyone from a kid who misbehaves in school to an adult who has trouble focusing on a single TV or computer screen at a time, ADHD is actually a clinical diagnosis. Learning more about what ADHD is – and isn’t – can help you determine if you or someone you love warrants further testing

ADHD stands for “attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder.” In common parlance, it’s used interchangeably with ADD, which stands for “attention deficit disorder.” However, this term refers to cases where there’s attention deficit, but no hyperactivity involved.
From a layperson’s point of view, ADHD means the person – often a child — has problems concentrating and paying attention.

Of course, that can be applied to pretty much any child over the course of a typical day. What sets people with ADHD apart is that the area of the brain responsible for clarity, mental focus and activity is actually wired differently. What that means is that even when you try to “settle down,” your mind just doesn’t want to comply. You can tell yourself to relax, focus, and pay attention, but you just can’t make your mind and body comply.

So from an outsider’s perspective, how do you tell if your child is just suffering from normal “wigglies,” or really has ADHD? Let’s take a look more closely.

Signs and Symptoms of ADHD

There are three main components of ADHD: hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity. Each has similar symptoms but they can be distinguished enough to determine if your child has one, two or all of the components.

Hyperactivity
Signs of hyperactivity include:
• difficulty sitting still, frequent fidgeting and squirming uncontrollably
• the inability to stay seated, even when they’re instructed to stay still
• inappropriate behavior like climbing or playing at inappropriate times, or on inappropriate objects like chairs or desks
• problems playing quietly when requested
• incessant talking even when instructed to be quiet

Inattention
Signs of inattention include:
• trouble staying on task for even short periods of time
• lack of attention when you are speaking to them
• issues with staying organized at school, work and home
• forgetfulness regarding assignments, requests, chores, homework, etc.
• easy distractability when performing a task

Impulsivity
Signs of impulsivity include:
• difficulty waiting in line
• blurting out of answers in class or in meetings even when not called on
• constant interruption of conversations

If you or your child has exhibited any of these signs, the next step is testing. A professional assessment can give you more insight into the condition, with regards to possible treatment and management.